New books in-store!

A heads-up for you that lead titles of 2016 are available now at Chapters…

If you are in the mood for an exquisite book, do visit and browse our new collection. Books make great gifts, and if you have a bibliophile in your life, then you will certainly like what’s on our shelves right now.

Happy shopping!


1. The book of Hygge: The Danish art of living well– Louisa Thomsen Brits

The most beautiful guide to the Danish custom of hygge, the everyday life philosophy for better living.

Hygge is a feeling of belonging and warmth, a moment of comfort and contentment. This beautiful little book will help you to find hygge and embrace it every day. Make a pot of coffee, relax in your favourite chair and discover for yourself how life is better with hygge.

 

‘Best [book] for the philosophy of hygge’ You Magazine

‘…a philosophy for mindful living’ The Guardian

‘Her book is a thing of beauty’Irish Examiner


2. The Can’t Sleep Colouring Journal- Dr Sarah Jane Arnold

When your mind just won’t switch off and you’re fed up of tossing and turning in your bed, pick up this unique book and discover a new and creative way of getting a good night’s sleep.

Along with gorgeous patterns to colour you’ll also find:

· Simple tailored exercises designed to calm the mind, promote well-being and help you relax, ready for sleep

· Expert hints and tips on developing a good bedtime routine

· Inspirational quotes and plenty of room for your own thoughts and musings


3. Elizabeth is Missing– Emma Healey

Sunday Times Top Five Bestseller Elizabeth is Missing is the stunning, smash-hit debut novel from new author Emma Healey

Winner of the Costa First Novel Award 2014
Shortlisted for National Book Awards Popular Fiction Book 2014
Shortlisted for National Book Awards New Writer of the Year 2014
Longlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize 2014
Longlisted for the Baileys Prize for Women’s Fiction 2015

Meet Maud.

Maud is forgetful. She makes a cup of tea and doesn’t remember to drink it. She goes to the shops and forgets why she went. Sometimes her home is unrecognizable – or her daughter Helen seems a total stranger.

But there’s one thing Maud is sure of: her friend Elizabeth is missing. The note in her pocket tells her so. And no matter who tells her to stop going on about it, to leave it alone, to shut up, Maud will get to the bottom of it.

Because somewhere in Maud’s damaged mind lies the answer to an unsolved seventy-year-old mystery. One everyone has forgotten about.

Everyone, except Maud . . .


4. William Shakespeare: Notes & Quotes

One of history’s most influential and renowned playwrights, Shakespeare was able to manipulate language in a way that still resonates to this day. This elegant notebook, featuring some of the best-known quotations from his works, will inspire writers as they pen their own jottings and thoughts.

Practical and stylishly designed, these pages contain soft lines and decorative illustrations throughout, so writers will enjoy getting organized and jotting down their notes wherever they are.


5. The Wicked Wit of Winston Churchill– Dominique Enright

The Wicked Wit of Winston Churchill by [Enright, Dominique]Sir Winston Churchill remains a British hero, lauded for his oratorical skill. He wrote histories, biographies, memoirs, and even a novel, while his journalism, speeches and broadcasts run to millions of words. From 1940 he inspired and united the British people and guided their war effort. Behind the public figure, however, was a man of vast humanity and enormous wit. His most famous speeches and sayings have passed into history but many of his aphorisms, puns and jokes are less well-known.

This enchanting collection brings together hundreds of his wittiest remarks as a record of all that was best about this endearing, conceited, talented and wildly funny Englishman.


6. The New Odyssey: The Story of Europe’s Refugee Crisis– Patrick Kingsley

Europe is facing a wave of migration unmatched since the end of World War II – and no one has reported on this crisis in more depth or breadth than the Guardian‘s migration correspondent, Patrick Kingsley. Throughout 2015, Kingsley travelled to 17 countries along the migrant trail, meeting hundreds of refugees making epic odysseys across deserts, seas and mountains to reach the holy grail of Europe.

This is Kingsley’s unparalleled account of who these voyagers are. It’s about why they keep coming, and how they do it. It’s about the smugglers who help them on their way, and the coastguards who rescue them at the other end. The volunteers that feed them, the hoteliers that house them, and the border guards trying to keep them out. And the politicians looking the other way.

The New Odyssey is a work of original, bold reporting written with a perfect mix of compassion and authority by the journalist who knows the subject better than any other.


7. The Girl on the Train– Paula Hawkins

23364977The debut psychological thriller that will forever change the way you look at other people’s lives.

EVERY DAY THE SAME
Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning and night. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. Jess and Jason, she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

UNTIL TODAY
And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel goes to the police. But is she really as unreliable as they say? Soon she is deeply entangled not only in the investigation but in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

“Nothing is more addicting than The Girl on the Train.”—Vanity Fair

The Girl on the Train has more fun with unreliable narration than any chiller since Gone Girl. . . . [It] is liable to draw a large, bedazzled readership.”—The New York Times

“Marries movie noir with novelistic trickery. . . hang on tight. You’ll be surprised by what horrors lurk around the bend.”—USA Today

“Like its train, the story blasts through the stagnation of these lives in suburban London and the reader cannot help but turn pages.”—The Boston Globe


⋅ See you soon at Chapters ⋅

 

 

Why You Need to Read “The Untamed State” Right Now!

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Roxane Gay’s debut novel is unlike your typical crime fiction thriller. “The Untamed State” will take you through an eye-opening chain of events surrounding the admirably strong Mirielle Duval Jameson- the novel’s sole heroine that we can assure you, you will never forget.

“Roxane Gay is a rock-star talent who’s already left her mark on the literary world, and her dazzling debut novel is certain to cement her place. . . . [a] haunting tale.”

—Morgan Ribera, Bustle

1. Mirielle Duval Jameson: An iron-willed protagonist.

A well-portrayed main character is crucial to a novel’s success- and Roxane Gay has certainly delivered with her task in doing so. We journey with Mirielle through this life-changing period of her life that begins with the dramatic day of her abduction to when she achieves self redemption. “They held me captive for thirteen days”, she relates, “they wanted to break me. It was not personal. I was not broken. This is what I tell myself.”

Mirielle is the daughter of one of Haiti’s wealthiest men. Her haunting account of the pain, abuse and torture endured for thirteen days in a cage, only goes to show her continued instinct for survival and her unexpected defiance meted out to the barbaric men behind the abduction.

She is, beyond doubt, a woman of exceptional bravery and fortitude, sure to be among the many other unforgettable female character known to us in fiction.


The character development of Gay’s protagonist, Mireille, is particularly well-crafted and nuanced; her portrayal of a woman who fights her strongest fight to resist being defeated by her captors is compelling and agonizingly felt by the reader. . . . This novel . . . will reward the reader.”

—Jim Carmin, Minneapolis Star Tribune

2. For better or for worse- a romance mingled with adversity.

Readers would agree that Mirielle and Micheal Jameson are a match made in heaven. From their first encounter in graduate school to his faithful companionship during Mirielle’s recovery- this love stands the test of time.

“When I tried to push him away, he only held on to me more tightly. I have always appreciated how he never lets me go. I need that. My natural instinct is for flight and the safety of solitude.”

Micheal embodies everything needed as a husband- a loyal partner, a devoted companion and an unflinching need to face the worst of circumstances to bring his wife to safety.

3. Roxane Gay’s talented storytelling

The Guardian mentioned the novel’s author Roxane Gay as “a writer of prodigious [and] arresting talent” and we agree wholeheartedly. Gay weaves this unforgettable story with a mix of romance, heartache, misery and a bit of humour as well. The fairytale element of her storytelling starts from the very beginning as she describes the day of Mirielle’s abduction; “Once upon a time, in a far-off land, I was kidnapped by a gang of fearless yet terrified young men..”

“An Untamed State” is a fierce read and the author’s insights into the world of Haiti’s underworld as well as the various ties that bind families together is also more reason for applause.


“My mother has often told me there are some things you cannot tell a man who loves you, things he cannot handle knowing. She adheres to the philosophy that it is secrets rather than openness that strengthen a relationship between a man and a woman. She believes this even though she is an honest person. Honesty, she says, is not always about the truth.”

“Once upon a time, my life was a fairy tale and then I was stolen from everything I’ve ever loved. There was no happily ever after. After days of dying, I was dead.”


We hope you enjoy reading the book as much as we did! Feel free to leave your thoughts on the comments below.

 

June Picks: Best of Crime Fiction

 

Detectives, homicides and mysterious disappearances- such are the stories that attract countless readers into the genre of crime fiction and mystery.

Here is our roundup of the the most gripping, fast-paced crime/mystery/thrillers, that are sure to keep you at the edge of your seat!



  1. 1. The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

    A debut psychological thriller that will forever change the way you look at
    other people’s lives.
    Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. “Jess and Jason,” she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

    And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

    Compulsively readable, The Girl on the Train is an emotionally immersive, Hitchcockian thriller and an electrifying debut.

Tip: Perfect fit for fans of “Gone Girl” and “Pretty is”

buy now


2. After Anna by Alex Lake

The real nightmare starts when her daughter is returned…

“The worst injuries are always self-inflicted, even if you do them for the best of reasons.”

A bone-chilling psychological thriller that will suit fans of Gone Girl by 25801299Gillian Flynn, Daughter by Jane Shemilt, and The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins.

A girl is missing. Five years old, taken from outside her school. She has vanished, traceless. The police are at a loss; her parents are beyond grief. Their daughter is lost forever, perhaps dead, perhaps enslaved. But the biggest mystery is yet to come: one week after she was abducted, their daughter is returned. She has no memory of where she has been. And this, for her mother, is just the beginning of the nightmare.

buy now


 

3. The Shut Eye by Belinda Bauer

27245646

Five footprints are the only sign that Daniel Buck was ever here.

And now they are all his mother has left.

Every day, Anna Buck guards the little prints in the cement. Polishing them to a shine. Keeping them safe. Spiralling towards insanity.
When a psychic offers hope, Anna grasps it. Who wouldn’t? Maybe he can tell her what happened to her son…
But is this man what he claims to be? Is he a visionary? A shut eye? Or a cruel fake, preying on the vulnerable?

Or is he something far, far worse?

‘The most polished crime writer on the murder beat . . . Exhausting, exhilarating and damn scary, another 24-carat creation from the Queen of Thrills’

-Daily Express

buy now


 

4. The Quality of Silence by Rosamund Lupton

On 24 November Yasmin and her ten-year-old daughter Ruby set off on a29979730 journey across Northern Alaska. They’re searching for Ruby’s father, missing in the artic wilderness.

More isolated with each frozen miles they cover, they travel deeper into an endless night. And Ruby, deaf since birth, must brave the darkness where sight cannot guide her.

She won’t abandon her father. But winter has tightened its grip, and there is somebody out there who wants to stop them.

Somebody tracking them through the dark.

Tip: We got a lot of praise from our customers on this one! Rosamund Lupton is also the author of Sister, a book crime fiction fans may be all too familar with.

buy now


 

5. The Life and Death of Sophie Stark by Anna North

Gripping and provocative, The Life and Death of Sophie Stark tells a story of fame, love, and legacy through the propulsive rise of an iconoclastic artist.

23281949“It’s hard for me to talk about love. I think movies are the way I do that,” says Sophie Stark, a visionary and unapologetic filmmaker. She uses stories from the lives of those around her—her obsession, her girlfriend, and her husband—to create movies that bring her critical recognition and acclaim. But as her career explodes, Sophie’s unwavering dedication to her art leads to the shattering betrayal of the people she loves most.


Told in a chorus of voices belonging to those who knew her best, The Life and Death of Sophie Stark is an intimate portrait of an elusive woman whose monumental talent and relentless pursuit of truth reveal the cost of producing great art, both for the artist and for the people around her.

“It’s hard for me to talk about love,’ she said. ‘I think movies are the way I do that.”

Tip: If you loved reading “The Girl on the Train”, this is a book you cannot miss!

buy now


 

6. In a Dark, Dark Wood by Ruth Ware

In a dark, dark wood
Nora hasn’t seen Clare for ten years. Not since Nora walked out of school 23346377one day and never went back.
There was a dark, dark house
Until, out of the blue, an invitation to Clare’s hen do arrives. Is this a chance for Nora to finally put her past behind her?
And in the dark, dark house there was a dark, dark room

But something goes wrong. Very wrong.
And in the dark, dark room….
Some things can’t stay secret for ever.

“The best thing about In A Dark, Dark Wood is the eerie atmosphere it creates for this ill-fated weekend, never overwrought, just ominous enough, the glass house where the guests are trapped ‘dark and silent, blending into the trees, almost invisible.’”

-USAToday.com
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7. Agatha Raisin books by M.C Beaton

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Agatha Raisin is a frustrated, yet endearing, PR agent who retires from London to Carsley village in the Cotswolds, English Midlands and solves murders. In the first book, Agatha Raisin and the Quiche of Death (1992), Agatha is 53, and ages slowly, setting up her own detective agency in Agatha Raisin and the Deadly Dance (2004). Police, even her friend Bill Wong, see more bumbling luck than skill.

She lives in the village of Carsely, but her detective agency Raisin Investigations and the police headquarters where Bill Wong is based are in the nearby town of Mircester. Even though Carsely and Mircester are fictional, they are based on true places; she does, however frequent Evesham, Moreton-in-Marsh, Stow-on-the-Wold, Chipping Campden and other nearby villages quite often. Agatha’s first case came when she first moved to Carsely and heard about a quiche competition. She promptly bought a spinach quiche in London from a famous quiche shop and entered it as her own. She was outraged she did not win but later the judge, Reg Cummings-Browne, took another slice and died from cowbane poisoning. Frustrated, Agatha set out to find the poisoner and clear her own name.


8. Tell No Tales by Eva Dolan

Detectives Zigic and Ferreira must investigate a hit-and-run that leaves two migrant workers dead and a series of horrific killings, seemingly with a Neo-Nazi motivation, captured on CCTVTell No Tales- Eva Dolan

The car that plows into the bus stop early one morning leaves a trail of
death and destruction behind it. DS Ferreira and DI Zigic are called in from the Peterborough Hate Crimes Unit to handle the hit-and-run, but with another major case on their hands, one with disturbing Neo-Nazi overtones, they are relieved when there seems to be an obvious suspect. But the case isn’t that simple and with tensions erupting in the town leading to more violence, the media are soon hounding them for answers.

Ferreira believes that local politician Richard Shotton, head of a recently established right-wing party, must be involved somehow. Journalists have been quick to acclaim Shotton, with his Brazilian wife and RAF career, as a serious contender for a major political career, despite his extremist views, but is his party a cover for something far more dangerous?

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9. The Stranger You Know by Jane Casey

16187115He meets women. He gains their trust. He kills them.

That’s all Maeve Kerrigan knows about the man she is hunting. Two women were strangled in their homes, and with no sign of a break-in, there’s no clue as to who might be responsible. Until there’s a third murder, and the finger is pointed at DCI Josh Derwent, Maeve’s colleague.

It isn’t the first time Derwent has been a suspect in a murder case, and these deaths bear an unsettling similarity to the last one he was accused of. Maeve refuses to believe he could be involved, but the secrets of his past begin to unravel. How well does she really know him?

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10. Hide and Seek by Jane Casey

‘If I hadn’t walked into the room at that moment, maybe everything would have 26006121worked out differently. Maybe everything would have been all right after all . . .’

Port Sentinel may be a beautiful seaside tourist trap, but in the short time Jess Tennant has lived there, it has seen its fair share of tragedy. Tragedy that somehow Jess keeps getting caught up in.

A schoolgirl from the town goes missing, leaving her diary behind and a lot of unanswered questions. Has she run away from her unhappy home or is there something much more sinister going on? And can Jess find her before it’s too late?

buy now

11. The Missing by Jane Casey

7619060Jenny Shepherd is twelve years old and missing…Her teacher, Sarah Finch, knows better than most that the chances of finding her alive are diminishing with every day she is gone. As a little girl her older brother had gone out to play one day and never returned. The strain of never knowing what has happened to Charlie had ripped Sarah’s family apart. Now in her early twenties, she is back living at home, trapped with a mother who drinks too much and keeps her brother’s bedroom as a shrine to his memory.

Then, horrifically, it is Sarah who finds Jenny’s body, beaten and abandoned in the woods near her home. As she’s drawn into the police investigation and the heart of a media storm, Sarah’s presence arouses suspicion too.

But it not just the police who are watching her…

buy now

12. After the Fire by Jane Casey

Arson, accident or murder?

After a fire rips through a North London tower block, two bodies are found24909778 locked in an 11th floor flat. But is the third victim that ensures the presence of detective Maeve Kerrigan and the murder squad. It appears that controversial MP Geoff Armstrong, trapped by the fire, chose to jump to his death rather than wait for rescue. But what was such a right wing politician doing in the deprived, culturally diverse Maudling Estate?

As Maeve and her senior colleague, Derwent, pick through the wreckage, they uncover the secret world of the 11th floor, where everyone seems to have something to hide…

buy now


Disclaimer: The book descriptions are extracts taken from the publishers of the respective books.

March Picks: Women’s Fiction and Chick-Lit

It’s International Women’s Day on 8th March and it would only be right to make a list of some celebrated female fiction at Chapters. These may include books by famous female writers, books that advocate the rights of women and perhaps most importantly, books with strong women characters in them. Here are some book recommendations for you to choose from, and celebrate with us- the many women- fictional and real, who were either bold and mischievous or undeniably exemplary- and whose contribution to literature has been admired the world over.


 

  1. We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

A personal and powerful essay from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the bestselling author of ‘Americanah’ and ‘Half of a Yellow Sun’, based on her 2013 TEDx Talk of the same name.We Should All Be Feminists- Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

What does “feminism” mean today? That is the question at the heart of We Should All Be Feminists, a personal, eloquently-argued essay – adapted from her much-viewed Tedx talk of the same name – by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the award-winning author of ‘Americanah’ and ‘Half of a Yellow Sun’.

With humour and levity, here Adichie offers readers a unique definition of feminism for the twenty-first century – one rooted in inclusion and awareness. She shines a light not only on blatant discrimination, but also the more insidious, institutional behaviours that marginalise women around the world, in order to help readers of all walks of life better understand the often masked realities of sexual politics. Throughout, she draws extensively on her own experiences – in the U.S., in her native Nigeria – offering an artfully nuanced explanation of why the gender divide is harmful for women and men, alike.

Argued in the same observant, witty and clever prose that has made Adichie a best-selling novelist, here is one remarkable author’s exploration of what it means to be a woman today – and an of-the-moment rallying cry for why we should all be feminists.

‘The book I’d press into the hands of girls and boys, as an inspiration for a future “world of happier men and happier women who are truer to themselves”’ Books of the Year, Independent

‘One and a half million YouTube viewings later, this small but perfectly formed talk has become an equally small but perfectly formed book, thanks to Fourth Estate. The perfect size in fact for handbags, pockets and Christmas stockings. There really is no excuse not to buy several’ Harpers Bazaar


 

‘A writer with a great deal to say’ The Times

‘Here is a new writer endowed with the gift of ancient storytellers.’ Chinua Achebe

‘Adiche [has] virtuosity, boundless empathy and searing social acuity’ Dave Eggers

‘Adichie is terrific on human interactions … Adichie’s writing always has an elegant shimmer to it … Wise, entertaining and unendingly perceptive’ Independent on Sunday

buy now

2. The Virginia Woolf Collection

Virginia Woolf is now recognized as a major twentieth-century author, a great novelist and essayist and a key figure in literary history as a feminist and a modernist. Born in 1882, she was the daughter of the editor and critic Leslie Stephen, and suffered a traumatic adolescence after the deaths of her mother, in 1895, and her step-sister Stella, in 1897, leaving her subject to breakdowns for the rest of her life. Her father died in 1904 and two years later her favourite brother Thoby died suddenly of typhoid.

With her sister, the painter Vanessa Bell, she was drawn into the company of writers and artists such as Lytton Strachey and Roger Fry, later known as the Bloomsbury Group. Among them she met Leonard Woolf, whom she married in 1912, and together they founded the Hogarth Press in 1917, which was to publish the work of T. S. Eliot, E. M. Forster and Katherine Mansfield as well as the earliest translations of Freud. Woolf lived an energetic life among friends and family, reviewing and writing, and dividing her time between London and the Sussex Downs. In 1941, fearing another attack of mental illness, she drowned herself.

Her first novel, The Voyage Out, appeared in 1915, and she then worked through the transitional Night and Day (1919) to the highly experimental and impressionistic Jacob’s Room (1922). From then on her fiction became a series of brilliant and extraordinarily varied experiments, each one searching for a fresh way of presenting the relationship between individual lives and the forces of society and history. She was particularly concerned with women’s experience, not only in her novels but also in her essays and her two books of feminist polemic, A Room of One’s Own (1929) and Three Guineas (1938).

Her major novels include Mrs Dalloway (1925), the historical fantasyOrlando (1928), written for Vita Sackville-West, the extraordinarily poetic vision of The Waves (1931), the family saga of The Years (1937), and Between the Acts (1941). All these are published by Penguin, as are her Diaries, Volumes I-V, and selections from her essays and short stories.

Browse her books here

buy now

3. Sleeping on Jupiter by Anuradha Roy

Sleeping on Jupiter - Anuradha RoyLONGLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2015

A stark and unflinching novel by a spellbinding storyteller, about religion, love and violence in the modern world.

A train stops at a railway station. A young woman jumps off. She has wild hair, sloppy clothes, a distracted air. She looks Indian, yet she is somehow not. The sudden violence of what happens next leaves the other passengers gasping.

The train terminates at Jarmuli, a temple town by the sea. Here, among pilgrims, priests and ashrams, three old women disembark only to encounter the girl once again. What is someone like her doing in this remote corner, which attracts only worshippers?

Over the next five days, the old women live out their long-planned dream of a holiday together; their temple guide finds ecstasy in forbidden love; and the girl is joined by a photographer battling his own demons.

The full force of the evil and violence beneath the serene surface of the town becomes evident when their lives overlap and collide. Unexpected connections are revealed between devotion and violence, friendship and fear, as Jarmuli is revealed as a place with a long, dark past that transforms all who encounter it.

Anuradha Roy won the Economist Crossword Prize, India’s premier award for fiction, for her novel The Folded Earth, which was nominated for several other prizes including the Man Asia, the D.S.C., and the Hindu Literary Award. Her first novel, An Atlas of Impossible Longing, has been widely translated and was named one of the best books of the year by the Washington Post and The Seattle Times.

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4. God Help The Child by Toni Morrison

Spare and unsparing, God Help the Child—the first novel by Toni MorrisonGod Help The Child - Tony Morrison to be set in our current moment—weaves a tale about the way the sufferings of childhood can shape, and misshape, the life of the adult.

At the center: a young woman who calls herself Bride, whose stunning blue-black skin is only one element of her beauty, her boldness and confidence, her success in life, but which caused her light-skinned mother to deny her even the simplest forms of love. There is Booker, the man Bride loves, and loses to anger. Rain, the mysterious white child with whom she crosses paths. And finally, Bride’s mother herself, Sweetness, who takes a lifetime to come to understand that “what you do to children matters. And they might never forget.”

A fierce and provocative novel that adds a new dimension to the matchless oeuvre of Toni Morrison.

Praise 

“Powerful . . . attests to her ability to write intensely felt chamber pieces that inhabit a twilight world between fable and realism, and to convey the desperate yearnings of her characters for safety and love and belonging . . . Writing with gathering speed and assurance as the book progresses, Ms. Morrison works her narrative magic, turning the Ballad of Bride and Booker into a tale that is as forceful as it is affecting, as fierce as it is resonant.”
—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

“Nobel laureate Morrison continues to add to her canon of eloquent, brilliantly conceived novels defining the crises and cultural shifts of our times  . . . Yet another finely distilled masterpiece.”
 Jane Ciabattari, BBC

“Powerful portraits in lean prose . . . . The pieces all fit together seamlessly in a story about beating back the past, confronting the present, and understanding one’s worth.”
—Barbara Hoffert, Library Journal, (starred review)

“Sly, savage, honest, and elegant . . . . Morrison spikes elements of realism and hyperrealism with magic and mayhem, while sustaining a sexily poetic and intoxicating narrative atmosphere . . . . Once again, Morrison thrillingly brings the storytelling moxie and mojo that make her, arguably, our greatest living novelist.”
—Lisa Shea, ELLE Magazine

 Read our review of the book here

Toni Morrison is the author of ten novels, from The Bluest Eye (1970) to Home (2012). She has received the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Pulitzer Prize. In 1993 she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

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5. Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen

Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen

The more I know of the world, the more am I convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!’

Marianne Dashwood wears her heart on her sleeve, and when she falls in love with the dashing but unsuitable John Willoughby she ignores her sister Elinor’s warning that her impulsive behaviour leaves her open to gossip and innuendo. Meanwhile Elinor, always sensitive to social convention, is struggling to conceal her own romantic disappointment, even from those closest to her. Through their parallel experience of love—and its threatened loss—the sisters learn that sense must mix with sensibility if they are to find personal happiness in a society where status and money govern the rules of love.

“Know your own happiness. You want nothing but patience- or give it a more fascinating name, call it hope.”


Jane Austen was an English novelist whose works of romantic fiction, set among the landed gentry, earned her a place as one of the most widely read writers in English literature, her realism and biting social commentary cementing her historical importance among scholars and critics.

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6. The Book of Night Women by Marlon James

The Book of Night Women- Marlon JamesFrom the WINNER of the 2015 Man Booker Prize for A Brief History of Seven Killings

“An undeniable success.” — The New York Times Book Review

The Book of Night Women is a sweeping, startling novel, a true tour de force of both voice and storytelling. It is the story of Lilith, born into slavery on a Jamaican sugar plantation at the end of the eighteenth century. Even at her birth, the slave women around her recognize a dark power that they and she will come to both revere and fear.

“Bad feeling is a country no woman want to visit. So they take good feeling any which way it come. Sometime that good feeling come by taking on a different kind of bad feeling.”

The Night Women, as they call themselves, have long been plotting a slave revolt, and as Lilith comes of age and reveals the extent of her power, they see her as the key to their plans. But when she begins to understand her own feelings and desires and identity, Lilith starts to push at the edges of what is imaginable for the life of a slave woman in Jamaica, and risks becoming the conspiracy’s weak link.

Lilith’s story overflows with high drama and heartbreak, and life on the plantation is rife with dangerous secrets, unspoken jealousies, inhuman violence, and very human emotion between slave and master, between slave and overseer, and among the slaves themselves. Lilith finds herself at the heart of it all. And all of it told in one of the boldest literary voices to grace the page recently–and the secret of that voice is one of the book’s most intriguing mysteries.

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7. Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

National Book Award Winner

Jacqueline Woodson, one of today’s finest writers, tells the moving story Brown Girl Dreaming By JACQUELINE WOODSONof her childhood in mesmerizing verse.

Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement. Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a child’s soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodson’s eloquent poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become.


Ms. Woodson writes with a sure understanding of the thoughts of young people, offering a poetic, eloquent narrative that is not simply a story . . . but a mature exploration of grown-up issues and self-discovery.”—The New York Times Book Review 

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8. I Am Malala by Malala Youzafzai and Christina Lamb

I Am Malala- Malala Youzafzai, Christina Lamb “I come from a country that was created at midnight. When I almost died it was just after midday.”

When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, one girl spoke out. Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education.

On Tuesday, October 9, 2012, when she was fifteen, she almost paid the ultimate price. She was shot in the head at point-blank range while riding the bus home from school, and few expected her to survive.

“We realize the importance of our voices only when we are silenced.”

Instead, Malala’s miraculous recovery has taken her on an extraordinary journey from a remote valley in northern Pakistan to the halls of the United Nations in New York. At sixteen, she has become a global symbol of peaceful protest and the youngest-ever Nobel Peace Prize laureate.

I Am Malala is the remarkable tale of a family uprooted by global terrorism, of the fight for girls’ education, of a father who, himself a school owner, championed and encouraged his daughter to write and attend school, and of brave parents who have a fierce love for their daughter in a society that prizes sons.

I Am Malala will make you believe in the power of one person’s voice to inspire change in the world.

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9. The Little Coffee Shop of Kabul by Deborah Rodriguez

From the author of the memoir Kabul Beauty School comes a fiction debut The Little Coffee Shop of Kabul- Deborah Rodriguez as compelling as real life: the story of a remarkable coffee shop in the heart of Afghanistan, and the men and women who meet there — thrown together by circumstance, bonded by secrets, and united in an extraordinary friendship.
After hard luck and some bad choices, Sunny has finally found a place to call home — it just happens to be in the middle of a war zone.

“Women are like tea bags; you never know how strong they are until they’re put in hot water. — ELEANOR ROOSEVELT”

As this group of men and women discover that there’s more to one another than meets the eye, they’ll form an unlikely friendship that will change not only their own lives but the lives of an entire country.
Brimming with Deborah Rodriguez’s remarkable gift for depicting the nuances of life in Kabul, and filled with vibrant characters that readers will truly care about, A Cup of Friendship is the best kind of fiction—full of heart yet smart and thought-provoking.

“This compelling tale features the stories of five women in Afghanistan and how living surrounded by conflict and danger affects their lives.” –Bella

“A heartwarming tale about female friendships.” –Cosmopolitan

“A brilliant story of strength and appreciation of difference that restores belief in humanity.” –Daily Telegraph

“A unique insight into the women of this volatile, fascinating place.” –East Anglian Daily Times

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10. True Love by Jennifer Lopez

True Love- Jennifer LopezThis is the story of how I discovered quite simply the truest love of all…

In Jennifer Lopez’s first ever book, True Love, she explores one of her life’s most defining periods—the transformative two-year journey of how, as an artist and a mother, she confronted her greatest challenges, identified her biggest fears, and ultimately emerged a stronger person than she’s ever been. True Love is an honest and revealing personal diary with hard-won lessons and heartfelt recollections and an empowering story of self-reflection, rediscovery, and resilience.

Includes more than 200 exclusive photographs from Lopez’s personal archives, showing candid moments with her family and friends and providing a rare behind-the-scenes look at the life of a pop music icon travelling, rehearsing, and performing around the world.

Jennifer Lopez is an award-winning actress, singer, dancer, entrepreneur, fashion designer, film producer, philanthropist, and now author. She is one of the most influential female artist-performers in history and proud mother of two children, Max and Emme.

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 11. Nora Webster By Colm Toibin

23342345* * * Shortlisted for the 2014 Costa Novel Awards * * *

Nora Webster is the heartbreaking new novel from one of the greatest novelists writing today.
It is the late 1960s in Ireland. Nora Webster is living in a small town, looking after her four children, trying to rebuild her life after the death of her husband. She is fiercely intelligent, at times difficult and impatient, at times kind, but she is trapped by her circumstances, and waiting for any chance which will lift her beyond them. Slowly, through the gift of music and the power of friendship, she finds a glimmer of hope and a way of starting again. As the dynamic of the family changes, she seems both fiercely self-possessed but also a figure of great moral ambiguity, making her one of the most memorable heroines in contemporary fiction. The portrait that is painted in the years that follow is harrowing, piercingly insightful, always tender and deeply true.

“We walk among them sometimes, the ones who have left us. They are filled with something that none of us knows yet. It is a mystery.”

Colm Tóibín’s Nora is a character as resonant as Anna Karenina or Madame Bovary and Nora Webster is a novel that illuminates our own lives in a way that is rare in literature. Its humanity and compassion forge an unforgettable reading experience.

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Loved ‘Gone Girl’? Take a Look at this New Teenage Thriller!

This new and exciting Y.A fiction book is definitely one of our favourite picks this month! This book is bound to appeal to readers who love fast-paced stories and intriguing plot-lines. Follow Me Back was beyond doubt, a gripping read and it certainly stands out from other teenage fiction novels, especially due to its original writing style and fresh dialogue.

A must-read for all teens and young adults ♥

Nicci Cloke is the new voice of teenage fiction and her latest book Follow Me Back– will not disappoint. Follow Me Back explores the reality of ‘digital duplicity’ and the dangers of social networks.

“CAN YOU REALLY BE SURE WHO’S TELLING THE TRUTH ONLINE?”

Lizzie Summersall’s disappearance becomes the subject of endless gossip at her high school. The police are convinced that she had met someone online. Her laptop, oddly enough, has been left behind which leaves them with the question: has she left or was she taken?

“There was no sign of a struggle, they whisper to each other. She took her phone but left her laptop behind.”

In the midst of all this panic is Aiden Kendrick, who hears about Lizzie’s disappearance for the first time when the police question him at his doorstep. Aiden and Lizzie were not the best of friends, just ‘online buddies’ who shared a few moments together at school before they lost touch with each other all together. So why is he the subject of their investigations unexpectedly? It is long before he realizes that Lizzie’s disappearance is about to change his life for good.

A smart, contemporary YA thriller that grips from the first page and never lets go.

Follow Me Back was named one of the best books of February 2016 and is perfect for fans of Gone Girl and We were Liars. buy now

 

Have you read any books set in the world of social media? Comment below and let us know!